The Wednesday Letters by Jason F. Wright

The Wednesday Letters (Adult Fiction)

Jason F. Wright

Jack and Laurel have been married for 39 years and every Wednesday, Jack has written a letter to his beloved…starting on their wedding night and ending on the night of his death.  When their children discover these letters, everything they thought they knew about their parents will be changed forever.

I found this to be two books in one. The first half is a love story told through weekly love letters, while the second half abruptly turns quite religious and spiritual—touching upon themes of redemption, faith, and forgiveness. While the story was laid out slowly and tenderly by Wright, I found the ending to be rushed and forced.  The author’s desire to wrap up every loose end in a nice, pretty bow felt awkward and sloppy and didn’t provide the satisfying conclusion that the author perhaps intended.

Rating: 3/5

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell (J)

Tween & Teen Tuesday

Every Tuesday, we review either a juvenile (J) or young adult (YA) book

 

Island of the Blue Dolphins

Scott O’Dell (Juvenile Fiction)

Based on the true story of a Nicoleño woman who survived alone on San Nicolas Island for 18 years, Island of the Blue Dolphins is about 12-year old Karana who is left alone on an island when the ship relocating her village abandons her.  Karana must rely on what she knows and what she remembers to ensure her survival.  Every day she scours the water looking for a sail—white will reunite her with her people; red will bring the despised Aleut otter hunters.  In a place where time is measured by the passing of suns and the changing of seasons, Karana forges a life for herself and finds courage, compassion, and companionship along the way.

Although O’Dell gave us Karana in 1960, I hope that a new generation discovers her and finds that a heroine doesn’t need a wand or a cape or even mystical powers.  Sometimes, the greatest heroine is strong and brave and kind because circumstances require them of her.

Rating: 5/5

I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh

I Let You Go

Clare Mackintosh (Adult Suspense)

Jenna Gray hopes to escape the memories of a tragic hit-and-run accident by moving to a remote cottage on the Welsh coast.  Meanwhile, two detectives are assigned to the case in hopes of finding justice.  The unexpected occurs when both their worlds collide.

This book truly surprised me (in a good way) inasmuch as I had already determined what direction the story was taking and how it was going to end.  The plot took such an unexpected turn, that I was left asking myself, “Wait.  What just happened?”  Very seldom does that happen so when it does, I relish it!  And if that wasn’t enough, Mackintosh throws in a few extra twists at the end…just for good measure.

I rated this book four stars rather than five only because it did languish a bit at the beginning, but the extra care and attention to fully developing the story and characters do pay off in the end.

 

Rating: 4/5

 

Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling

Captains Courageous

Rudyard Kipling (Adult Fiction)

Harvey Cheyne is the spoiled, arrogant, and disrespectful son of a railway tycoon who, while on his way to Europe to complete his schooling, falls overboard into the Atlantic Ocean.  He is rescued by a fisherman and taken aboard the schooner We’re Here, where he quickly realizes that money, power, and social status matter little on the high seas.  Under the watchful eye of Captain Disko Troop, Harvey soon navigates his way not only through perilous oceans, but also through the turbulent lessons that come with life.

This is perhaps one of the finest stories about life on the sea ever written.  Kipling’s narration is masterful and the storytelling is superb.  The details of life on board a schooner are painstakingly described and detailed—right down to the last eye-bolt.  Every word is carefully chosen and crafted and the result is nothing short of poetic: “The dories gathered in clusters, separated, reformed, and broke again, all heading one way; while men hailed and whistled and cat-called and sang, and the water was speckled with rubbish thrown overboard.”

This book is truly deserving of the word “classic”; however, Kipling’s passion for authenticity often makes reading dialogue difficult at times.  His phonetic transcription of a New England dialect in the late 1800s is often tricky to decipher and comprehend (“furriner” for “foreigner”, “naow” for “now”, and “spile” for “spoil”), but it is this same commitment to genuineness that allows the reader to be wholly transported into a world dictated by the weather and ruled by the sea.  A coming-of-age book about loyalty, friendship, and love that truly gets better with time.

Rating: 5/5

 

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr (JB)

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

Eleanor Coerr (Juvenile Biography)

Sometimes it’s the shortest books that stay with you the longest.

Twelve-year old Sadako Sasaki was just a baby when the atom bomb—the Thunderbolt—was dropped on Hiroshima.  Sadako was always in a hurry to be first and more than anything, she wanted to be on the junior high relay team.  But then the dizzy spells began, and she would soon discover that she had the atom bomb disease…leukemia. Sadako’s friend told her an old story that if a sick person folds one thousand paper cranes, the gods would grant her wish and make her well.  By folding one crane at a time, Sadako begins her dire quest for health.

Using a book published by Sadako’s classmates, Coerr lovingly shares the story of a young girl who faced death fearlessly.  Sadako Sasaki showed more raw courage, determination, and hope in her 12 short years than many of us ever hope to achieve in a lifetime.  Her story deserves to be learned, and her hope for peace should not be restricted between the covers of this book.

Rating: 5/5

The Pleasure of My Company by Steve Martin

The Pleasure of My Company

Steve Martin (Adult Fiction)

Daniel Pecan Cambridge is a man suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder who, on the surface, appears quite content with the cards that life has dealt him.  However, by peering at the world outside his window, he sees hope, opportunity, and something that absolutely terrifies him…something different.

I adore Steve Martin as an actor and was anxious to see if I would enjoy him as a writer as well.  I must admit that I almost didn’t give this book the chance it deserved. Daniel’s character was a little too self-absorbed (perhaps the title should have clued me in) and neurotic for my liking.  It truly is a matter of sheer will at times to keep reading since Daniel is such an intolerable, infuriating, and exasperating person.  But just as Martin can masterfully pull at his banjo strings, he enables Daniel to somehow pull at our heartstrings and we find ourselves cheering for the unlikeliest of heroes.

Rating: 3/5

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo (J)

Tween & Teen Tuesday

Every Tuesday, we review either a juvenile (J) or young adult (YA) book

 

The Tale of Despereaux (J)

Kate DiCamillo

“This story begins within the walls of a castle, with the birth of a mouse.  A small mouse.  The last mouse born to his parents and the only one of his litter to be born alive.”

So begins DiCamillo’s beautiful and heartwarming tale of a mouse with a heart almost as big as his ears.  Despereaux Tilling loves music and stories.  He dreams of knights and princesses and faraway places.  After an unfortunate accident plunges the kingdom of Dor into darkness and despair, it will be up to this one small, unlikely hero—with such very large ears—to save the day.

DiCamillo weaves a wondrous and captivating story that will enchant readers both young and old.  With very short chapters, this book is ideal for younger readers or could be set on a nightstand for shared bedtime reading.

I hope that Despereaux not only finds a permanent place on your bookshelf, but in your heart as well.

Rating: 5/5