Some Writer! The Story of E. B. White by Melissa Sweet (JB)

Tween & Teen Tuesday

Every Tuesday, we review either a juvenile (J) or young adult (YA) book

 Some Writer! The Story of E. B. White

Melissa Sweet (Juvenile Biography)

Elwyn Brooks White, known to his friends as Andy and his fans as E. B. White, was a writer for The New Yorker and Harper’s magazine, a poet, essayist, and children’s book author.

Readers who have delighted in the works of White throughout the years will appreciate this accounting of his life.  Sweet includes White’s personal photographs, copies of rough manuscripts, journal entries, and correspondence to give us a unique insight into the life of a man who loved animals almost as much as his own privacy.  Young readers may grow a little bored when Sweet talks about White’s editing and grammatical style contributions, but the short chapters, as well as Sweet’s mixed media artwork and beautiful illustrations, will keep readers engaged and provide a pleasurable reading experience.

I enjoyed learning more about the author who provided the world with, what I believe to be, one of the most compelling and dramatic opening sentences in children’s literature: “Where’s Papa going with that ax?”  After reading this wonderful biography, you too will agree that E. B. White was indeed some writer.

Rating: 5/5

 

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr (JB)

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

Eleanor Coerr (Juvenile Biography)

Sometimes it’s the shortest books that stay with you the longest.

Twelve-year old Sadako Sasaki was just a baby when the atom bomb—the Thunderbolt—was dropped on Hiroshima.  Sadako was always in a hurry to be first and more than anything, she wanted to be on the junior high relay team.  But then the dizzy spells began, and she would soon discover that she had the atom bomb disease…leukemia. Sadako’s friend told her an old story that if a sick person folds one thousand paper cranes, the gods would grant her wish and make her well.  By folding one crane at a time, Sadako begins her dire quest for health.

Using a book published by Sadako’s classmates, Coerr lovingly shares the story of a young girl who faced death fearlessly.  Sadako Sasaki showed more raw courage, determination, and hope in her 12 short years than many of us ever hope to achieve in a lifetime.  Her story deserves to be learned, and her hope for peace should not be restricted between the covers of this book.

Rating: 5/5