The Egypt Game by Zilpha Keatley Snyder (J)

The Egypt Game

Zilpha Keatley Snyder (Juvenile Fiction)

April Hall is anything but a typical sixth grader.  Having a “movie star” mother, it is easy to understand why April prefers to be called April Dawn, wears false eyelashes, and sports a mile-high hairdo.  What in the world could she possibly have in common with Melanie Ross, a girl that lives in her same apartment building?  Why, ancient Egypt, of course!  Thus begins an amazing friendship that involves secrets, codes, ancient ceremonies, and danger.  This story not only provides readers with some history, but offers important lessons on inclusion, forgiveness, compassion, and courage.  SPOILER:  There is a part of the book that involves the murder of a child (no gory details), so parents should take this into account when dealing with sensitive  readers.

Rating: 4/5

My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George (J)

My Side of the Mountain

Jean Craighead George (Juvenile Fiction)

When Sam Gribley decided to run away from his New York apartment and live in the Catskill Mountains, everyone laughed…even his own father.  But that is exactly what he did, armed with only a penknife, ball of cord, ax, flint and steel, and $40 from selling magazine subscriptions.  With grit, determination, skill, and courage, Sam not only survives on the mountain, but discovers things about himself that he never thought possible.  Beautifully detailed and crafted, My Side of the Mountain is a story for all ages and for all time.

Rating: 5/5

 

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver (Adult Fiction)

This is the story of a Baptist missionary family who travel to the Belgian Congo in 1959.  Having the mother and four daughters each narrate this story gives the reader five thoughtful and unique viewpoints of the same events. At 543 pages, the novel spans three decades, but seems to go well beyond its natural endpoint and unnecessarily drags out to the point of reader fatigue. The author could have easily skimmed 150 pages and still had a poignant and interesting story. I gave it 4 stars rather than 3 because the writing is superb; however, the author does get very political and uncomfortably preachy at times.

Rating: 4/5

 

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznik (J)

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Brian Selznik (Juvenile Fiction)

An enchanting and mesmerizing book that is as much of a treat for the eyes as it is for the heart. Brian Selznik’s original drawings masterfully tell the story of 12-year old Hugo, an orphan who secretly repairs the clocks of a Paris train station after the disappearance of his uncle.  Selznik provides readers with a mini-movie that can easily be forwarded or rewound with the simple flip of a page.  I knew about Georges Méliès before reading this story and was delighted to be able to revisit him on a more personal level. Although you can read this book over a weekend, its beauty and compassion will stay with you far longer.

Rating: 5/5

Miracle on the 17th Green by James Patterson

Miracle on the 17th Green

James Patterson (Adult Fiction)

I normally don’t gravitate toward James Patterson, but this little book drew me in and is a total departure from his normal thriller books. This quick read is a story of love, family, and chasing your dreams…no matter the cost. Some parts were a little technical for a non-golfer like me, but a story of redemption and forgiveness is written in a universal language that everyone can understand and enjoy.

Rating: 4/5