The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver (Adult Fiction)

This is the story of a Baptist missionary family who travel to the Belgian Congo in 1959.  Having the mother and four daughters each narrate this story gives the reader five thoughtful and unique viewpoints of the same events. At 543 pages, the novel spans three decades, but seems to go well beyond its natural endpoint and unnecessarily drags out to the point of reader fatigue. The author could have easily skimmed 150 pages and still had a poignant and interesting story. I gave it 4 stars rather than 3 because the writing is superb; however, the author does get very political and uncomfortably preachy at times.

Rating: 4/5

 

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznik (J)

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Brian Selznik (Juvenile Fiction)

An enchanting and mesmerizing book that is as much of a treat for the eyes as it is for the heart. Brian Selznik’s original drawings masterfully tell the story of 12-year old Hugo, an orphan who secretly repairs the clocks of a Paris train station after the disappearance of his uncle.  Selznik provides readers with a mini-movie that can easily be forwarded or rewound with the simple flip of a page.  I knew about Georges Méliès before reading this story and was delighted to be able to revisit him on a more personal level. Although you can read this book over a weekend, its beauty and compassion will stay with you far longer.

Rating: 5/5

Miracle on the 17th Green by James Patterson

Miracle on the 17th Green

James Patterson (Adult Fiction)

I normally don’t gravitate toward James Patterson, but this little book drew me in and is a total departure from his normal thriller books. This quick read is a story of love, family, and chasing your dreams…no matter the cost. Some parts were a little technical for a non-golfer like me, but a story of redemption and forgiveness is written in a universal language that everyone can understand and enjoy.

Rating: 4/5

 

Gingersnap by Patricia Reilly Giff (J)

Gingersnap

Patricia Reilly Giff (Juvenile Historical Fiction)

After her brother Rob is reported missing in action during WWII, young Jayna, along with her turtle and a ghost, set out from upstate New York to Brooklyn in hopes of finding her grandmother.  Gingersnap is a quick read, making it ideal for elementary-aged kids. Just shy of 150 pages, it doesn’t allow the reader much of an opportunity to get to know or become connected with the characters, but a happy ending during a wartime book is always a plus.  With included soup recipes, this book is wonderful for the body and soul.

Rating: 4/5

 

Greetings and salutations!

Welcome to The Dusty Jacket!  A site to reintroduce those long-forgotten books that have resided on library shelves or along thrift store aisles for far too long.  Their jackets may be dusty, but the stories they tell are just as vibrant and alive as ever!

We don’t review the latest and greatest, but the “seasoned” stories who are awaiting to be revisited a second or third time or perhaps newly discovered.  We review adult, teen, and tween books and hope that one of the books reviewed will strike your fancy, elicit a contradictory response, or rekindle an old sentiment.  Whatever the emotion, we hope that we reignite your love for reading or begin a fire that has yet to be fanned.

Relax, enjoy, and read!  Our hope is that no book will go unread and no jacket will ever become dusty.